HOW TO CREATE SWAP FILE ON CENTOS SERVER

This is a very basic guide: creating a Swap file on your CentOS server to act as a backup RAM space. Well, this task is optional but you better create one (if your VPS doesn’t come with Swap yet) to avoid OOM (Out of Memory) error. For your information -in case you didn’t know it yet- a Swap file can be described as a small amount of space created on a servers hard drive (or SSD) to simulate and act as backup RAM.

Using a HDD as RAM is probably not very good idea but it is a good practice especially in the event when your server is out of memory and you couldn’t effort to add more RAM immediately. In the ideal situation using SSD is really recommended.

INGREDIENTS OF THIS TUTORIAL

  1. A server / VPS with enough RAM and HDD or SSD. In this article I use a 512MB cloud server from Atlantic.net. Do not have one? Read my list of recommended VPS providers as well as this list of 20 low end cloud server providers.
  2. A CentOS Distro installed (I use CentOS 7)
  3. Putty and basic knowledge on how to use it.
  4. A computer or laptop to access your server
  5. A cup of coffee or tea.

So here it is a simple tutorial you can follow. Let’s start with common rule of how large is a swap file should be created. The most common practice is to add half of your existing RAM up to 4GB. For example: if you have 1GB actual RAM allocated to your vps, then you can create about 512MB swap file.

The simple calculation is:

1024 block size x 512MB = 524288 block size. Now add that to the command:

dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=1024 count=524288

it simply looks like this

Next, create a swap file area using this command syntax:

mkswap /swapfile

pic:

Define the owner of the newly created swap file and swap area then set correct permission on it:

chown root:root /swapfile
chmod 0600 /swapfile

Activate Swap you newly setup using this command:

swapon /swapfile

Finally, issue command below to verify that Swap has been setup and enabled:

swapon -s
screenshot:

The last thing to do is to configure Swap to run and enabled each time your server reboots. Use Nano editor (or vi) to adjust fstab setting:

nano /etc/fstab

then add following line at the very bottom (Thanks to Adam):

/swapfile none swap sw 0 0

which in my case it looks like this:

Save changes and exit the editor (in Nano it is Control+O then Control+X).

From here on, each time you check your RAM usage using free -m command, it should display your swap too.

[QUICK TIP] HOW TO UPGRADE YOUR VPS FROM DEBIAN 8.0 TO 8.1 (JESSIE)

Here I come again with very basic tutorial and this time I’ll show you how to upgrade your server running Debian 8.0 to Debian 8.1 along with a simple command how to check your Debian version.

ABOUT DEBIAN 8.1

Debian 8.1 codename Jessie was released at June 6th, 2015. It is the first update of its stable distribution Debian 8. This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available. You can read full change log here.

HOW TO UPGRADE

Step 1 – Login to your server as root or as user with sudo privilege:

Step 2 – Check which version your Distro is. Use command below:

lsb_release -a

It will look like this

Step 3 – Finally, here’s the magic command to upgrade your Ubuntu server:

apt-get upgrade -y

Step 4 – That’s it. Now you can double-check it again to make sure it has been upgraded successfully.

Enjoy..

INSTALL MYSECURESHELL ON UBUNTU, CENTOS, DEBIAN AND FEDORA VPS

Follow steps below to build a working secure FTP server using MySecureShell on Ubuntu, CentOS, Debian and Fedora VPS. Before we step forward, it is better to firstly read some basic information about what MySecureShell is.

Based on OpenSSH, MySecureShell is a really lightweight very secure FTP server you can install in major Linux distribution. MySecureShell is shortly a great alternative to vsvtpd because it is more secure, multi-platform and it is free (Open Source license).

SOME KEY FEATURES

  • Bandwidth control function;
  • Security rights information ;
  • Only authorized files and folders can be shown ;
  • Easy installation and administration of the server with a graphical interface ;
  • Management of activity of the server with logs ;
  • Restrictions of users by ip, groups ;
  • Power Encryption ;
  • No certificate problems non-certified or certificate generation ;
  • Support public and private keys for secure authentication without password ;
  • Only one port to open for SSH and SFTP (port 22 by default) ;
  • The protocol used is much more optimized than FTP because it is based on the protocol of the NFS ;
  • Free and open source ;
  • Advanced logging information ;
  • ACL can be made with IP/Usernam/Groups/VirtualHost/… ;
  • Confined environments (chroot, which is also available in the latest version of OpenSSH) ;
  • Restrict users to have sftp only (shell access is disabled by default) ;

HOW TO INSTALL

The easiest way to install MySecureShell server on your vps is done via repository which luckily can be added in few seconds. Here’s the steps for each Linux distribution:

Step 0 – Login to your server as root or as user with sudo privilege then switch to root by using sucommand.

On Debian Server

Step 1 – If your server is running on Debian 8, simply issue command below:

apt-get install mysecureshell -y

That’s it. Luckily MySecureShell is included already in Debian 8 repository.

Step 2 – But however if you chose to use Debian 7 or lower, then you have to follow more steps below:

Edit source.list file with your favorite editor program like Nano

nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Step 3 – Now put this text overthere

deb http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/ubuntu testing main
deb-src http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/ubuntu testing main

Do not forget to save changes and exit the editor (In Nao it is Control+O then Control+X)

Step 4 – Import GPG Key with this one liner:

gpg --keyserver hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys E328F22B; gpg --export E328F22B | apt-key add -

Step 5 – Finally update your server so the newly added repositoryy can be applied.

apt-get update -y

Step 6 – Finally. Here’s the magic command to install it:

apt-get install mysecureshell -y

On Ubuntu Server

Step 1 – If your server is running on Ubuntu 15.04, simply issue command below:

apt-get install mysecureshell -y

That’s it. Luckily MySecureShell is included already in Ubuntu 15.04 repository.

Step 2 – But however if you chose to use Ubuntu 14.04 or lower, then you have to follow more steps below:

Edit source.list file with your favorite editor program like Nano

nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Step 3 – Now put this text overthere

deb http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/ubuntu testing main
deb-src http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/ubuntu testing main

Do not forget to save changes and exit the editor (In Nao it is Control+O then Control+X)

Step 4 – Import GPG Key with this one liner:

gpg --keyserver hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys E328F22B; gpg --export E328F22B | apt-key add -

Step 5 – Finally update your server so the newly added repository can be applied.

apt-get update -y

Step 6 – Finally. Here’s the magic command to install it:

apt-get install mysecureshell -y

On CentOS Server / RHEL

Step 1 – You have to firstly alter /etc/yum.conf file. So edit it using your favorite text editor like Nano:

nano /etc/yum.conf

Step 2 – In Nano, scroll down the page and put these lines in the end part:

[mysecureshell]
name=MySecureShell
baseurl=http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/centos/$basearch/
enabled=1
gpgcheck=0

Do not forget to save changes and exit the editor (In Nao it is Control+O then Control+X)

Step 3 – Finally update your server so the newly added repository can be applied.

yum update -y

Step 4 – Then now use command below to start the installation:

yum install mysecureshell -y

On CentOS Server / RHEL

Step 1 – You have to firstly alter /etc/yum.conf file. So edit it using your favorite text editor like Nano:

nano /etc/yum.conf

Step 2 – In Nano, scroll down the page and put these lines in the end part:

[mysecureshell]
 name=MySecureShell
 baseurl=http://mysecureshell.free.fr/repository/index.php/fedora/$basearch/
 enabled=1
 gpgcheck=0

Do not forget to save changes and exit the editor (In Nao it is Control+O then Control+X)

Step 3 – Finally update your server so the newly added repository can be applied.

yum update -y

Step 4 – Then now use command below to start the installation:

yum install mysecureshell -y

That’s it. MySecureShell is now ready-to-use. Thanks for reading 🙂

[QUICK TIP] HOW TO FIND OUT VESTA CP MYSQL ROOT PASSWORD

This is how you can find out default VestaCP MySQL root password and how the correct safe way to change it – The password is generated randomly and stored at mysql.conf file. As you may already knew it that Vesta CP is by default not directly show you Mysql root password right after the installation. So many users are still confused when they are in need to login to mysql server as root.

What’s your VestaCP MySQL root password?

The password is stored at:

/usr/local/vesta/conf/mysql.conf

So to find out what’s the password you can simply open up that file using your favorite text editor like Nano or vi:

nano /usr/local/vesta/conf/mysql.conf 
the password is the one shown in PASSWORD=’randompassword‘. Note down that password or copy-paste it to Notepad.

Changing MySQL root password in VestaCP

Basically you can simply use usual way when you need too change mysql root password but that’s not the case with Vesta CP. There are another files you have to alter so Vesta CP can still run properly after password changing. Here’s how:

Step 1 – Use this usual mysql command to change password:

mysqladmin -u root -pOLDPASSWORD password 'NEWPASSWORD'

Replace OLDPASSWORD with the real mysql root password you get from mysql.conf file above. Also replace NEWPASSWORD with the new password you wish, just make sure you can remember it or noted in down.

Step 2 – Once done, try login back to mysql server as root using the new password you’ve just defined:

mysql -u root -pNEWPASSWORD

Step 3 – Open up mysql.conf file once again and replace your old password (the one generated by Vesta) with your new password:

nano /usr/local/vesta/conf/mysql.conf

Save changes and exit the editor which in Nano it is Control+O then Control+X.

Step 4 – Next, you have to change old mysql password stored in my.cnf:

nano /root/.my.cnf

replace that with the one you defined in step 1.

That’s all. You can now open PhpMyAdmin and login as root with password you’ve just created. Do not also forget to give it a test by creating new database via Vesta CP interface. I’m sure at some point you may need to know or change default Vesta CP mysql root password like what I did during Mysql Master – Slave replication setup.

HOW TO ADD DOMAIN REDIRECTION IN VESTA CP

Well I think this topic is pretty interesting: how to create domain / web redirection using VestaCP. The solution is basically simple which I think if you are familiar enough with LAMP (or say Apache), but it is pretty confusing for some newbies. So here it is a short / quick Vesta Control Panel tutorial dedicated for newbie.

Unlike WHM/cPanel that provides certain menu to create Domain Redirection so a user will understand what is it and how to use it, VestaCP doesn’t have that feature so users will have to make use of and create Apache .htaccess Redirection manually.

THIS IS IN WHM/CPANEL

AND DO THIS IN VESTACP

Step 1 – Install VestaCP on your server. Follow step 1 till 4 (Stage 1) of this tutorial to get it done.

Step 2 – Now login to VestaCP dashboard and add new website. Click on WEB menu then click Add Web Domain.

Step 3 – Type in the domain name you want to forward / redirect then click the green Add button.

once done you’ll see this message:

Step 4 – Now launch Putty or Terminal up and login to your server via SSH as root or as user with sudo privilege (or as admin if you configured admin to have SSH access)

Step 5 – Now go to web directory of your newly added website/domain which it should be at this location:

cd /home/user/web/domain.tld/public_html

In my situation it is:

cd /home/admin/web/servermomtest.com/public_html

replace user and domain.tld with your own. Example:

Step 6 – Create new .htaccess file (or edit it if it’s created already):

nano .htaccess

Step 7 – Now put these lines in there:

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^example.com [NC,OR]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www.example.com [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://example.org/$1 [L,R=301,NC]

the htaccess redirection above does 301 redirect from example and www.example.com to http://example.org and so that old links to example.com carry over. Just replace example.com and example.net above with your own.

Now save changes and exit the editor. In Nano it is Control+O then Control+X.

That’s it. Now everytime anyone opens example.com or www.example.com will be forwarded to example.com. And so if anyone opens example.com/any-link or www.example.com/any-link will be redirected to example.org/any-link. Cool huh?

I really hope that helps.

CPANEL TO CWP MIGRATION TUTORIAL

CentOS Web Panel (CWP) has recently being one of most popular free control panel. It is a great alternative especially when zPanel project has been shut down. Its sleek user interface makes users enjoy managing websites on their servers easily. I personally like CWP and being my second alternative after VestaCP. One of my favorite CWP’s feature is its ability to perform cPanel backup restoration make it easier to restore full website backup created by famous cPanel CP.

So here it is a complete guide (with pics) on how to move a website from cPanel to CWP automagically using full cPanel backup. You don’t even have to download the backup file to your local PC / laptop as we are also going to use wget. I’ll try to write the tutorial easy-to-understand so do not hesitate to tell me in which part makes you confused. Let’s start..

INGREDIENTS

  1. A server / VPS running CentOS 6.5 or 6.6 either 32-bit or 64-bit. However if your VPS has only 512MB RAM, then go with 32-bit. Need recommendation? Read my recommended VPS providers list.
  2. A basic knowledge about common Unix command to SSH to your server.
  3. SSH client like Putty or Terminal and ability to use it.
  4. A spare time of yours
  5. A cup of coffee or tea.

In this tutorial I use a 512MB cloud server from Atlantic.net running CentOS 6.6 32-bit with CWP v0.9.8.6. I will move my friend’s old website from cPanel to CWP so make sure you you change the domain name replacing it with yours.

PREPARATION

Step 1 – Login to your server as root and follow my guide to install CWP.

Step 2 – Perform some basic CWP setup tasks.

Step 3 – Do not change your domain’s NS yet until you migrate the websites.

BACKUP CPANEL

Step 1 – Login to your cPanel account using username and password given by your webhosting provider:

Step 2 – Once you logged in to cPanel, click the Backup Wizard icon > click the Backup button > then click the Full Backup button. See illustrations below:

Step 3 – In the next page, make sure you choose “Home Directory” as Backup Destination. In case if your hosting account has many files consume large amount of disk space, you better also provide an email address to send notification when the backup process complete. Finally click the Generate Backup button.

Step 4 – Now go back to cPanel homepage and open up File Manager, choose the Home Directory then click the Go button.

Step 5 – In the File Manager page you’ll see the newly created backup file with .tar.gz ending. Right click on it and choose Move. Now type public_html as the destination.

Step 6 – Then go to public_html directory, find the backup file, right-click on it and change its permission to 644:

Step 7 – Right-click on that file again and choose Rename then change its name with cpmove- prefix followed with the account name.

Format: cpmove-(USER).tar.gz
Example account test: cpmove-test.tar.gz

THE MIGRATION

Step 1 – Now go back / login back to your server / VPS as root and go to /home directory.

Step 2 – It is time to transfer the full cPanel backup file to your VPS using simple wget command:

 wget http://domain.tld/cpmove-user.tar.gz


Do not forget to replace domain.tld and cpmove-user.tar.gz accordingly. See screenshot pic above.

RESTORING TO CWP

Step 1 – So now you have the full cPanel backup file in your VPS located in /home directory. CWP need it to be placed in that location. Open up your favorite browser and login to CWP control panel as root.

Step 2 – Once logged in, click the User Accounts menu at the left then choose cPanel Migrationsub menu.

Step 3 – In the next page, type in the username part of the file name then hit the Search button.

Step 4 – Next, you will see something like this below, now click the Restore button.

Step 5 – You’ll then see new page asking you to create new account. Fill in all required fields accordingly. See example below. Do not forget to click the Create button.

Step 6 – That’s it. You’ll then see a page similar to this one below indicating the restore process has completed.

FINISHING UP

The migration is almost complete. The very last thing to do is now to change the NS record of your domain. Go to your domain registrar and change current NameServers to the new ones belong to your server. Wait till all DNS propagates then give your newly moved sites a test confirming all functions of your websites are working. Enjoy..

INTEGRATING LET’S ENCRYPT SSL WITH ISPMANAGER CONTROL PANEL

I think a lot of you have already read the news about plans of Google to start labeling as “insecure” all websites that transmit passwords or ask for credit card details over plain text HTTP. This is another great reason why Let’s Encrypt, a service delivering free SSL/TLS certificates, is rapidly gaining traction. The key feature of Let’s Encrypt is secure data encryption over HTTPS protocol for any web project.

Until recently, the only downside of Let’s Encrypt had been a time consuming process of certificate issue. It had always scared off those users who simply didn’t have enough command line skills. Restricting certificate validity periods with 90 days for security purposes was only worsening the situation.

In order to fix it, LE developers created a process automation script which was smoothly integrated in ISPmanager, a hosting control panel. By using the intuitive interface of ISPmanager any user can easily receive a free SSL/TLS certificate from Let’s Encrypt for their website. Furthermore, the following processes are fully automated in ISPmanager:

  • Issue;
  • Installation;
  • Renewal of SSL/TLS certificates.

I have already told you about ISPmanager, a control panel with premium functionality and affordable price of 4 EUR/month. Let’s Encrypt alone can cover your expenses for ISPmanager if there are a few domains created. In the given article I’m going to tell you about how user friendly and intuitively this functionality is organized.

* Trial (unlimited in functionality) can be downloaded from ISPmanager website.

HOW TO INSTALL LET’S ENCRYPT SSL ON ISPMANAGER

Step 0 – First of all, let’s create a website with free Joomla CMS (see Joomla installation in ISPmanager).

Step 1 – Open ISPmanager and install the free Let’s Encrypt integration module. Login as root, then go to “Integration” → “Modules” and click “Install” against “Let’s Encrypt”.

Step 2 – Click “Ok” after the module is installed.

 

Step 3 – Next, you can issue the SSL certificate by going to “WWW” → “SSL certificates” and click “Let’s Encrypt”.

Step 4 – Fill out a form with information about your website and company, then click “Ok”. In a few minutes a Let’s Encrypt certificate will be issued and installed. The certificate will be available in SSL certificates menu.

Step 5 – Now you need to set up redirection of requests from HTTP website to the secure HTTPS. Visit “WWW” → “WWW-domains”, then choose a domain in question and click “Edit”.

Step 6 – Check the box “Redirect HTTP-requests to HTTPS” and click “Ok”.

Step 7 – Now your domain is secure. The certificate will be updated automatically every 3 months, and your website visitors can be sure that their data is secured. I hope it will help making your clients even more satisfied!

Voila! Your website is now accessible through https:// protocol. Enjoy!

Guide to installing NGINX + PHP-FPM + MariaDB on Debian 7 & 8

This tutorial will guide you through the steps to get nginx, php5-fpm and MariaDB working on your server with Debian 7 or 8 installed. This will run just fine on a 128MB OpenVZ VPS.

Let’s get started by installing nginx. First you’ll need to add the nginx repo to get the latest stable release installed on your server. Follow the simple steps below.

Installing Nginx and adding repository

Login to your server using either PuTTy or your favourite SSH client and use the following commands.

Make sure to get the right keys added or else the install will fail with a key error;

wget http://nginx.org/keys/nginx_signing.key
apt-key add nginx_signing.key

Add the NGINX repository to your sources.list, for debian 7 (Wheezy) change jessie to wheezy;

echo 'deb http://nginx.org/packages/debian/ jessie nginx' /etc/apt/sources.list

Now perform an update and upgrade and install the latest stable version of nginx;

apt-get update apt-get upgrade
apt-get install nginx

Now let’s configure our first website. Go to /etc/nginx/conf.d, remove the default.conf and example_ssl.conf and create a new your-website.conf file using nano (apt-get install nano).

cd /etc/nginx/conf.d
rm default.conf example_ssl.conf
nano your-website.conf

Copy and paste the following configuration file into your-website.conf, make sure to change the your-website.tld to your own domain name you’d like to use. Use CTRL + C to save the file once you’re done in nano;

server {
    listen 80;
    root /var/www/your-website;
    index index.php index.html;
    server_name your-website.tld www.your-website.tld;
    location / {
            try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php;
    }
    location ~ \.php$ {
            try_files $uri =404;
            fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
            include fastcgi_params;
            fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php5-fpm.sock;
    }
}

If you’d like to have SSL enabled on your website then please use the following configuration file, this will also redirect all non HTTPS/SSL request to HTTPS/SSL. Make sure to have a valid .pem and a .key file in your /etc/ssl directory.

server {
    listen 80;
    root /var/www/your-website;
    index index.php index.html;
    server_name your-website.tld www.your-website.tld;
  return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
    location / {
            try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php;
    }
    location ~ \.php$ {
            try_files $uri =404;
            fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
            include fastcgi_params;
            fastcgi_pass unix:/var/lib/php5/php5-fcgi.sock;
    }
}
server {
    listen   443;
    ssl    on;
    ssl_certificate    /etc/ssl/your-website.pem;
    ssl_certificate_key    /etc/ssl/your-website.key;
    root /var/www/your-website;
    index index.php index.html;
    server_name your-website.tld www.your-website.tld;    
    location / {
            try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php;
    }
    location ~ \.php$ {
            try_files $uri =404;
            fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
            include fastcgi_params;
            fastcgi_pass unix:/var/lib/php5/php5-fcgi.sock;
    }
}

Now let’s create the /var/www directory and give nginx permissions to the /var/www folder.

chown -R nginx:nginx /var/www

Installing PHP5-FPM

Now, let’s go and install PHP5-FPM and some of the extra PHP5 modules.

apt-get install php5-fpm php5-common php5-sqlite php5-gd php5-mysqld php-pear php5-imap php5-mcrypt php5-curl

Now we’re going to make a few modifications to the php.ini file located at /etc/php5/fpm/php.ini and we’re going to replace the php.ini file with a file optimized for wordpress by me (this will make wordpress load faster).

cd /etc/php5/fpm
rm php.ini
wget --no-check-certificate https://raw.githubusercontent.com/joodle/Hiawatha-MariaDB-PHP5-FPM-SQLBuddy/master/php.ini

Now we’ll need to make a few small changes to our php-fpm.conf configuration file so that nginx will be able to load PHP files. I already have a almost pre-configured php-fpm.conf on github, which will make things a bit easier.

cd /etc/php5/fpm
rm php-fpm.conf
wget --no-check-certificate https://raw.githubusercontent.com/joodle/Hiawatha-MariaDB-PHP5-FPM-SQLBuddy/master/php-fpm.conf

We’re going to change some permission settings in the php-fpm.conf file. Nginx will otherwise complain about not being able to access the php5-fcgi.sock file which is needed to execute php files on the server end.

Open php-fpm.conf in the nano text editor and search for the following;

[www]
user = www-data
group = www-data

And replace it with;

[www]
user = nginx
group = nginx

Save the file using CTRL + C and press Y.

Create a php information file at the /var/www/your-website directory;

echo /var/www/your-website/phpinfo.phpsite/phpinfo.php

Now restart php-fpm and nginx;

systemctl restart php5-fpm.service
systemctl restart nginx.service

Or when you’re using Debian 7;

service php5-fpm restart
service nnginx restart

Navigate to http://your-website.tld/phpinfo.php and if everything went alright you should see a page containing some information about the php version you’ve installed on your server.

Installing MariaDB MySQL Server

First we’ll have to add the MariaDB official repository plus keys.

apt-get install software-properties-common
apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com 0xcbcb082a1bb943db
add-apt-repository 'deb http://mirror.i3d.net/pub/mariadb/repo/10.1/debian jessie main'
apt-get update

Let’s install MariaDB;

apt-get install mariadb-server

Make sure to have a strong password for the MariaDB (MySQL) root user. You can generate strong passwords on random.org (https://www.random.org/passwords/).

You can add/create databases using the following commands;

<strong>Login to MySQL</strong>: mysql -u root -p
<strong>Add user</strong>: CREATE USER 'YOUR-OWN-USERNAME'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'YOUR-OWN-PASSWORD';
<strong>Add database</strong>: CREATE DATABASE DATABASENAME;
<strong>Assign user to database</strong>: GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON DATABASENAME . * TO 'YOUR-OWN-USERNAME'@'localhost';
<strong>Delete database</strong>: DROP DATABASE DATABASENAME;
<strong>Delete user</strong>: DROP USER 'YOUR-OWN-USERNAME'@'localhost';
<strong>Flush all privileges</strong>: FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

That’s it! Now you have a server with Nginx + PHP5-FPM + MariaDB installed!

How to install Windows Server 2016 On OVH, Kimsufi or SoYouStart servers

Are you looking to install Windows Server 2016 on your server, and are you renting your server at OVH? That’s awesome! You can install Windows on your server free of charge besides license costs, but that is up to you, we only provide the template.

Please do note: this template might work on other servers at other providers as well (Online.net and Hetzner for example).

This is a 180 days Evaluation template, but you can still use your own license (if you have one).

Follow the steps to install Windows on your server just one simple command.

1. Boot your server in rescue mode.
2. Login with the SSH credentials which should have been sent to your email address (if on OVH).
3. Copy the command in the box below and paste it in the terminal, press enter and wait till it’s fully downloaded and unzipped.

wget -O- 'https://mirror.joodle.nl/WindowsServer2016Evaluation-Template.gz' | gunzip | dd of=/dev/sda

Once fully downloaded and unzipped set your server to boot from the HDD again and wait till the Remote Desktop is accessible.

You can login using these credentials:

Username: Administrator
Password: Password147

Microsoft Windows on DigitalOcean!

You can now run Microsoft Windows on your DigitalOcean Droplet!

I am pleased to share we have completed our initial beta template build for Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard Evaluation and confirmed the template is fully operational on DigitialOcean’s 512MB RAM droplet!

We will be building additional templates over the next several days and plan to include Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2, Microsoft Windows Server 2016 and Microsoft Windows 10.

You may locate all of the beta builds on our DC2 mirror – http://onlinenet-dc2.mirror.whatuptime.com/

More to come!